Adeje Water Route, past and present this Sunday

The Adeje councillor for tourism, Ermitas Moreira García, announced details of this Sunday’s Water Route,  which will see performances in costume along the way, underlying the important role water has played in the evolution of the borough.  The route is scheduled to coincide with World Water day (celebrated this week) and the performances will be by the Adeje Municipal Folklore School.  It will be in Spanish with simultaneous translation into English

The councillor explained that “the riches of our heritage are very relevant, not just for residents, but also for those who visit, looking for new experiences.  The re-evaluation of our history, a history which unites us, is a fundamental task in the building of a viable tourist destination. For that reason, the water route is an excellent way to remember the importance of this natural resource, looking at is use and relevance from an historic perspective”.

The route will start at 11am, from the entrance to the Barranco del Infierno, following on to the Arriba mill, the Tres Chorros fountain, the Old Mill, orchards, the Fort House, the Santa Úrsula Church, the Calle Grande, Calle Sindical, and onto the plaza at Cruz del Llano.  An addition this year will be a scene showing the lives of the Marquises of Adeje.

Anyone who would like to take part can do so, and participation is free.  You will need to arrive on time to the starting point at the Barranco del Infierno.

Adeje has always been considered a privileged location, in the past as it is today. The borough had the biggest number of springs along the coast – two higher up where the Erques ravine is, three in the area known as El Aserradero, two in the Barranco del Infierno, one at the top of the Barranco del Agua, another at the foot of the Roque de los Brezos and another beside the Roque de Imoque.  The borough was a settlement area for a large group of Guanches, (the local aborigine inhabitants). This was also the home of the ‘Gran Tinerfe’ one of the most important chieftains in Tenerife in his time, whose statue today is at the entrance to the town of Adeje.

After the conquest of the island, in the south, and particularly in Adeje, water played a very important role as a local resource, with the Rio de Adeje (the Adeje river) flowing from the Barranco del Infierno down to the sea.


For more info on Tenerife read the Red Queen Musings everyone’s favourite Tenerife Blog
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